Catamaran sailing – South Myanmar – 1/3

Comment is Closed

Catamaran sailing

1 week sailing without Wi-Fi. There is no reception on the Burmese ocean. No problem at all! The trip is so relaxing and full of great things to see and do, you will not miss internet at all.

Let’s start at the beginning. We booked a week Catamaran sailing trip on the Myanmar south coast with Intrepid. One of the best international sailing agencies. The itinerary was set, but we soon learned that the itinerary would regularly change depending on the wind and weather conditions.

From the Burmese Kawthaung pier, we entered the Catamaran around midday. After everyone arrived on the boat (8 passengers, 4 crew), we received a warm (no, hot) welcome on the boat and got the safety briefing. After the briefing, we got our cabins assigned and lunch was served.

Picture: Catamaran on deck  Picture: The catamaran

A great start of the day. However, not long after we set sail, we found ourselves in bad weather. A rocky start, preventing us from  snorkeling at the first planned snorkel reef around shark island.


Night 1 – Thae Yae (Ghost Island)

Around the evening the wind settled down and we arrived and anchored at our first destination: Thae Yae island. How amazing it is to float in the middle of small islands, no people around in miles apart from some squid fisherman on their boats.

Picture: Front deck of the catamaran with beanbags Picture: View from the catamaran at nightfall           

Our sailing trip was in March, and it gets very, very hot in March in Myanmar. Although our room had fan’s, we decided to sleep on the deck, under a million stars on some beanbags. Very dreamy. The next morning we went back to the shark island snorkel reef, however, because of the storm and strong current, the visibility was not so good. We understand that normally, it is a great place to see many fish and beautiful coral reefs. Speaking of reefs, in the last years, big amounts of coral reefs have been destroyed by fisherman using dynamite to catch their fish. The Myanmar government has noticed this, and has forbidden the use of dynamite. However, sometimes they still use dynamite. Besides its effect on the coral reefs, it is also very dangerous for divers diving within a 2 mile radius. Another big environmental issue is the pollution of Myanmar’s nature gem. The locals  typically do not know what the effects are of throwing trash in the ocean, as to the naked eye, the current takes the trash away.. Sailing along, for some storm dodging and bird watching at Nyua Wee island.

Night 2 – Nyua Wee

Upon arrival, a big group of Plain Pouched Hornbills (birds) followed us to get some dinner. Our captain decided to throw them some left over fish. An amazing sight watching these massive birds diving steep into the water to catch their prey. Looking all tough and rough, the sounds they make though, sound like a baby crying..

Picture: Plain Pouched Hornbill Picture: Sunset from the catamaran

In this area, right in between two islands, there is a small mangrove, wherein the Moken people (original inhabitants of the southern Burmese island group) have built a very tiny village. We could not get very close, because of the tide, however, even from a distance, it was humbling to see how these people live. Especially knowing the history of the Moken people, being banned from the only place they called home for many years by the Burmese government. After that, a refreshing swim was welcomed by the group. We did some canoeing, sup-boarding, relaxing, reading on the deck and swimming. Upon sundown, a group of us jumped into the dingy (small motor boat) to see some pretty special Great Hornbills, hovering above the boat.A lovely dinner was prepared, and the mood of the group was perfect. Impressed, relaxed and tired of the day, but in a good way. Time to sleep under the blanket of stars again, but not before watching an amazing sunset..

Interested in reading Myanmar sailing blog 2 of 3? click here.


See for yourself!

A Travel log on the Catamaran sailing experience in Myanmar.

 


You might also like:

 

Comments

comments